Project Grow


WKU Project Grow coordinator and graduate assistant Beth McGrew, embrace in a hug during a WKU Project Grow meeting at the Office of Sustainability. “Being given the opportunity to have a community garden, that’s kind of like a blank canvas, to see what kind of community garden the community wants.” McGrew says.

Students work together to smash boiled acorns during a WKU Project Grow meeting at the Office of Sustainability. The shells are cracked and removed from the boiled acorns and then used to make an acorn cornmeal. The goal of cooking together is to put the products grown from the garden to use in their everyday life, in order to contribute to the sustainability of the environment.

Beth McGrew prepares to clean the many acorns that she collected. She boiled them in preparation to grind them up into an acorn meal.

Project Grow fellows, Alex Hezik of Campbellsville and Anthony Steiner of Bowling Green talk about what they want to plant in the hugelkultur in the spring. A Hugelkultur is a no-dig raised beds with a difference. They hold moisture, build fertility, maximise surface volume and are great spaces for growing fruit, vegetables and herbs. Hugelkultur , pronounced Hoo-gul-culture, means hill culture or hill mound.

Campbellsville junior Alex Hezik, works in the community garden at the WKU Office of Sustainability. Hezik is a fellow at the Office of Sustainability and a part of Project Grow, which is a WKU community garden project

Christian Ryan, coordinator for the Office of Sustainability at Western Kentucky University has a strategy session with Anthony Steiner about how the backyard will be transformed in the spring.

Christian Ryan, coordinator for the Office of Sustainability at Western Kentucky University looks after seedlings that are to be used for the winter plantings.

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